Chemistry 117
 Beloit College > Chemistry > Chem 117

 Course Information

Chemistry
Why is chemistry important to other sciences, technology, and society? What processes do chemists use when dealing with real problems? What conceptual models do chemists use to understand and explain their observations? The focus of this course is on the reasons for doing science, the intellectual and instrumental tools used, the models developed to solve new problems, and the assertion that chemistry has a tremendous effect on your personal life and on the decisions made by society. Along the way, we cover atoms, molecules, ions, and periodic properties; chemical equations, stoichiometry and moles; Lewis structures and VSEPR model of bonding; reactivity and functional groups; states of matter and molecular interactions; relationships between structure and properties. Topical applications and issues vary with the instructor and may include climate change, food and fuel, and energy use for lighting. Three two-hour class periods per week of combined lecture, laboratory, and discussion. (4U) Prerequisite: facility with algebra.

Required Material:
Gilbert, Kirss, Foster,Bretz, and Davies. (2017) Chemistry, 5th ed.
Safety goggles
Sewn laboratory notebook
Three-ring binder
Calculator with scientific notation

Inclusivity is a demonstration of equity and social justice through awareness, understanding, and respect for the differences in identity, culture, background, experience, and socialization, and the ways in which these forms of difference impact how we live and learn. Inclusivity requires equitable, institution-wide representation and access to resources. In practice, this manifests itself by each individual being aware of, committed to, and responsible for the well-being and care of all students, staff, and faculty.

This course meets on land that is located on the traditional territory of Indigenous peoples, and we respectfully acknowledge the Potawatomi, Peoria, Miami, Meskwaki, and Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) people who have stewarded this land throughout countless generations. We pay respects to their elders both past and present and, as we gather here for class and lab, we consider the legacies of violence, displacement, and settlement that they have faced. We are always on Indigenous land, and here on the campus we have a constant reminder in the form of the mounds. To recognize the land is an expression of gratitude and appreciation to those on whose territory you reside, and a way of honoring Indigenous people. Land acknowledgments do not exist in a past tense, or outside historical context: colonialism is an ongoing process, and we need to build our mindfulness of our present participation.

Student Evaluation

Daily Questions/Quizzes (approximately 24 x 10 pts. each; drop 3 lowest) 210 points
Exams (4 x 50 pts. each; drop the lowest one) 150 points
Lab Notebook Review (6 x 10 pts.; drop lowest) 50 points
Formal Written Reports (3 x 50 pts.) 150 points
Total 560 points

The three lowest daily question/quiz scores and the lowest lab notebook grade will be dropped. If you miss class or lab for any reason (illness, religious observance, field or athletic trip, family, etc.), that day's grade will be among those dropped. You should save these for when you need them. Missing more than three days of class and one day of lab will negatively affect your grade. The maximum number of absences allowed for this course is six combined class or lab periods. Missing more than this maximum will result in automatically failing the course.

Exams in this class are open book, course packet, and notes. They are one-hour exams, though anyone may work for the full two hours. You will need a calculator that computes exponents. You may not use a phone, computer, or tablet on any quiz or exam.

Grading Scale A (93%-100%) A- (90%-92%)
B+ (87%-89%) B (83%-86%) B- (80%-82%)
C+ (77%-79%) C (73%-76%) C- (70%-72%)
D+ (67%-69%) D (60%-66%) F (less than 60%)
Online Gradebook [Login Required]

If you have a disability and need accommodations, contact Learning Enrichment and Disability Services (LEADS) located on 2nd floor Pearsons (north side), 608-363-2572, learning@beloit.edu or through olesena@beloit.edu. For accommodations in my class, you are to bring me an Access Letter from the Director of LEADS and then we will discuss how to implement the accommodations. Contact that office promptly; accommodations are not retroactive.

Free peer tutoring is available for most classes. Tutoring for this course is available in the Library, most days/times from Sundays through Thursdays from 6-9 pm. You may drop in and/or apply via the Portal. Specific days/times will be posted on the beloit.edu/learning web site and at the site in the Library. For a personal tutor, apply by going to your Portal, to the Student Life tab, and then apply using the Tutoring Forms (on left) and Request a Tutor. If you have any questions, contact LEADS.

Exam 1 Key
Schedule:

 Part 1: The What and Why of Climate Change [Physcial Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry]

Date Class and Lab (in SC 247/249 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.) Resources and Readings
January 20 (1) What is this class about?
January 22 (2) No class: I will be attending a NSF Review panel.
January 24 (3) What is a gas molecule? [Lewis dot structures and electronic shape]
January 27 (4) Which gasses are greenhouse gasses and why? [Molecular Shape, Electronegativity, and IR spectroscopy]
January 29 (5) Measuring gasses. [Gas laws -- Mass/Pressure]
    Before class: Read textbook sections 8.3 and 8.5. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete questions 8.57; 8.63; 8.85; and 8.91 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].

    Properties of Gases (Text Figures)
    Linear Excel Graphing Macro
January 31 (6) Measuring gasses. [Gas laws -- Volume/Pressure and Volume/Temperature]
February 3 (7) What are the sources and sinks of greenhouse gasses? [Data interpretation and presentation]
February 5 (8) Understanding reactions that create and use up greenhouse gasses. [Balancing chemical equations and moles]
    Before class: Read textbook sections 3.2 and 3.3. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 3.23; 3.27; 3.33; 3.35; 3.55; and 3.61a [check your answers in the back of the textbook].

    Moles and Balancing Equations (Text Figures)
    Chemical Calculations (reference)
February 7 (9) Modeling reactions involving greenhouse gasses. [Dimensional analysis and stoichiometry]
    Before class: Read textbook sections 1.9; 3.4; and 3.5. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 1.43; 1.59; 3.61b; and 3.67 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].

    Unit Conversions (examples for writing calculations in one line)
February 7 Woodard Lecture: Dr. Maureen Raymo -- Climate, CO2, and Sea Level: Past is Prologue [4:00 p.m.]
February 10 (10) Uneven amounts in chemical reactions. [Limiting reagents]
February 12 (11) Why do we use fossil fuels? [Calorimetry]
    Before class: Read textbook sections 5.1 and 5.5. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 5.47 and 5.53 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].

    Heat (Text Figures)
February 14 (12) Why do we use fossil fuels? [Enthalpy calculations]
    Before class: Read textbook sections 5.9 and 8.7. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 5.99; 8.127; and 8.129 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].

    Bond Energies (Animation)
    Bond Energies (Text Figures)
February 17 (13) Integrative Project 1 -- Synthesis of a Copper-Ammonia Complex
    Before class: Read textbook sections 3.6. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 3.77 and 3.85 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].

February 19 (14) Integrative Project 1 -- Quantifying Ammonia [Titration]
    Before class: Read textbook section 4.6. Work the sample problems as you read.

February 21 (15) Integrative Project 1 -- Quantifying Copper [Absorbance spectrometry]
    Before class: Read textbook pages 156-157. Work the sample problems as you read.

February 24 (16) Integrative Project 1 -- Calculations and Report Writing
February 26 (17) Exam 1

 Part 2: What is Asprin and How does it work? [Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry]

Date Class and Lab (in SC 247/249 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.) Resources and Readings
February 28 (18) Talking about organic molecules. [Molecular representations and Chemical Functional Groups]
    Before class: Read textbook section 2.8.
March 2 (19) Chemical Function Group Characteristics [Acids and bases]
    Before class: Read textbook section 4.5. Work the sample problems as you read.
March 4 (20) Molecular Interactions [Intermolecular forces -- Polarity]
    Before class: Read textbook sections 10.1 through 10.4. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 10.9; 10.13; 10.27; 10.37; 10.41; and 10.47 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].
March 6 (21) Moldeular Interactions [Intermolecular forces -- Hydrogenation]
    Before class: Read textbook section 20.6. Work the sample problems as you read. Complete 20.3 and 20.65 [check your answers in the back of the textbook].
Midterm Break
[March 9-13]
No Class

 Distance-Learning Course

Google classroom
Date Class and Lab (in SC 247/249 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.) Resources and Readings
March 23 Identification of Chemical Funtional Groups using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)
March 25 Identification of Chemical Funtional Groups using Irfrared (IR) Spectroscopy
March 30 Application of IR spectroscopy to plastics
April 1 Limiting Reactants
April 3 Percent Yield
April 6 Chemical Titrations and Associated Calculations
April 8 Determining the molecular weight via Titration
April 10 Identifying Metals
April 13 Hot Materials Producing Light
April 15 Physical Propetries of Metals (Light bulb)
April 17 Design an Incandescent Lightbulb
April 20 Halogen Lightbulbs
April 24 The Size of Atoms and Ions
April 27 Ionic precipitates
April 29 LED Lightbulbs
May 1 Acid Rain
May 4 Isotope Dating

Last edited on March 20, 2020 by Ted Gries